Skating Ski

The skating ski has evolved in the cross country ski world over time. Skating began in the nordic world around 1980 with US cross country skier Bill Koch, who landed a gold metal in the US Olympics due to his innovation of pushing the ski off to the side rather than keeping them in the ski track.  The skating ski is now more popular than the classic cross country ski.  Skate skiing is a much faster technique, and does not require specific waxes relating to snow temperatures.  However skate skis can only be used in groomed conditions, preferably harder, older snow.  When the snow is too soft it is difficult to skate ski efficiently.

The skating ski differs from the classic ski.  It typically is a shorter ski and is designed to push from side to side.  There are several manufacturers of staking skis including Rossignol, Salomon and Fischer.

Below are a few examples of different skating skis and some subtle differences.  The main differences between skating ski types are weight, stability and price.  The performance race ski is less stable, lighter and more expensive. The entry level skating ski will give greater stability and handling, which is important when just starting out.  Purchase skate skis here: http://www.skiandsportshack.com/skate-skiing-gear/

Performance Skate Skis include:

Ski Name

Ski Weight

Sidecut

Ski Lengths

Rossignol X-IUM NIS Skating Ski

1100 g

44/43/43

173 180 186 192cm

Fischer Carbonlite Hole Skate Plus

980 g

/ /

177 182 187 192cm

Salomon S-Lab EQ 10 Skate Ski

1000 g

44/43/44

177 182 187 192cm

Mid-Level Skate Skis include:

Ski Name

Ski Weight

Sidecut

Ski Lengths

Rossignol   Delta Skating NIS

1140 g

45/44/44

173 180 186 192cm

Salomon   Equipe 9 Skate

1250 g

42/44/45

174 179 186 191cm

Entry-Level Skate Skis include:

Ski Name

Ski Weight

Sidecut

Ski Lengths

Rossignol Zymax NIS Skating

1270 g

44/43/43

160 170 180 190cm

Fischer   CRS Skate NIS

1350 g

/ /

172 177 182 187 192cm

Salomon Equipe 8 Skate

1270g

42/44/45

174 179 186 191cm

Salomon   Vitane 8 Skate for Women

1270g

42/44/45

174 179 186 191cm

 

Sidecut = tip/middle/tail width in centimeters. The narrower the sidecut the straighter the ski will want to travel. The greater the sidecut the more ski will want to turn.